Weekly Film Log: January 19-25

From this point forward, since I’ll be starting school again on Monday, my reviews may be a little bit shorter. With the exception of films that I have a particular need to write a bunch about, I will try to only make my reviews about a paragraph long.

But y’all may be pleased to see that this week has been particularly fun for, well, lots of reasons. Wanna know how? Read forward to find out!

Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975) – dir. Peter Weir

  • Watched on 19 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 8/10

While the praise surrounding Picnic at Hanging Rock left me with rather high expectations regarding its quality, what I didn’t expect was that this film, in many respects, is a well-executed horror. The real meat of the story doesn’t actually come into play until about halfway through; until then, we are treated with some of the most beautiful, tranquil nature cinematography I’ve seen in any film. Everything is calm and slow-paced – but when conflict strikes, the terror accompanying it is full-fledged. But what keeps the film so tantalizing is the way it never reaches the satisfying fulfillment of solving the many mysteries the film has to offer. What results from the sudden disappearance at hand is disturbing and illuminates just how constricting the surrounding environment is. Yet is is this atmosphere that keeps such an odd tale so inexplicably fascinating. I could only imagine there being multiple interpretations to a story of this magnitude, so weird and so enigmatic. Thus, repeated viewings are necessary, for me at least.

La Cage Aux Folles (1978) – dir. Édouard Molinaro

  • Watched on 19 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 7/10

Like just about anyone else, I enjoy a good comedy. La Cage Aux Folles (I don’t know anyone who actually calls it The Mad Cage) is essentially just another “when opposites meet” comedy of manners, this one dealing with a gay man who must try to hide his flamboyant lifestyle to impress his son’s soon-to-be in-laws. The humor of the film may not be all-too consistent, but when it works, it really works. The sets and costumes are all ridiculously gorgeous, even doing their own part to add to the written gags. However, the film does suffer considerably from its direction, which comes off as uninspired and relatively lifeless. I’ve read that the american remake The Birdcage does a considerably better job on this matter, so I’ll be watching that soon. I’m really glad I watched La Cage, though. I could see a stage production of this being some genuinely great fun I wouldn’t want to miss out on!

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007) – dir. Andrew Dominik

  • Watched on 19 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 8/10

It’s tempting to call The Assassination of Jesse James a more modern adaptation of classical western genre tropes, but I think it works beyond traditional story to create a more flesh-out narrative and groups of characters. Roger Deakins demonstrates some absolutely marvelous cinematography, truly setting the mood for the whole film with a multitude of breathtaking shot compositions. Coupled with this are series of great performances from everyone involved. Although it’s become increasingly harder for me to see Brad Pitt as anyone but “Brad Pitt playing ____”, his Jesse James performance is possibly his best and his most closest to transcendence. Casey Affleck, however, gives the finest and most complex performance of the whole film, highlighting the nuanced deficiencies of his character with ease. Although this film has a tendency to drag on and on at parts (being especially guilty of this in its final third), it remains aesthetically lovely and narratively engrossing the whole way through.

Fast, Cheap, & Out of Control (1997) – dir. Errol Morris

  • Watched on 20 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 7/10

Fast, Cheap, & Out of Control is an interesting sort of documentary that somehow ties together four very different occupations by means of their individual brand of idiosyncrasies. By not voicing his own intents with the making of this film, documentary veteran Errol Morris leaves the story-telling up to the unique professionals that devise the subject of the flick. Therefore, it lies completely open to interpretation over just what the means behind this film are exactly. This is heightened by the laid-back, inviting tone put forth by the film, and although I much prefer the director’s more darker-tinged topics, I think he did a good job with this more warm-hearted work.

The way I took it was that each of the four occupations – the lion tamer, the topiary fellow, the naked mole rat specialist, and the robot dude – represented their own special ways that humanity comes to try to understand the growth and development of intelligence, biologically or otherwise. Moreover, it also felt like a pure testament to individuals that live for doing what make them feel the most alive. Personally, documentaries about people doing things they love are some of my most favorites, and I can certainly see this one growing with me over time.

Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975) – dir. Chantal Akerman

  • Watched on 20 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 10/10

Since watching Jeanne Dielman, I haven’t been able to stop thinking about it. It’s an unusual kind of film in that it rigorously demands interpretation of what seems like every facet of its being. This is due to its fiercely slow-paced structure, which forces viewers to may mind to every mere movement and action of our titular character. Exposition never actually happens; we’re just thrown into her mundane everyday tasks and obliged to accept the tediousness. It seems rather banal, but deceptively, character starts to build and what initially seems implicit starts to ever-so-slowly bubble above the surface. Very minor setbacks seem multiplied by a thousand in this claustrophobic environment. Even something as insignificant as peeling potatoes feels intense when it’s one of the greatest challenges of the day.

I can’t exactly pinpoint how, but somewhere along this plodding anti-journey, I felt the unraveling begin to unfurl. Little things started to go wrong with her routine, and sure they were just little things, but it seemed to have started a ripple effect, which seemed more significant as time proceeded to move forward. Thus ending in the moment of catharsis that results in the (figurative and literal) climax that ends the film. Akerman’s Jeanne Dielman is like nothing I’ve ever seen before. It is extremely subtle and, honestly, a bit difficult to sit through. But the payoff is exceptionally satisfying, and I don’t expect future rewatches of this gem to be nearly as difficult. It’s very quickly become one of my very favorite films of the 70s, as well as having given me more incentive to watch all of Akerman’s films. A must-experience.

Serial Mom (1994) – dir. John Waters

  • Watched on 20 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 6/10

(What better way to follow Jeanne Dielman than with Serial Mom?! Yeah!)

Anyone who knows me knows that I enjoy a good John Waters movie. His dark sensibility just really speaks to me in ways that no other filmmaker has come close to. Unfortunately, it goes to show that he certainly falters at least slightly in his more recent works, in attempts to appeal to a wider mainstream audience. From what I’ve seen so far, Serial Mom is the worst perpetrator of this. It’s a story that has so much potential for a grandiose amount of buildup for the twisted character the film centers itself around. Basically, it had the potential to be a partner film of Waters’ legendary Female Trouble. Unfortunately, this buildup is cut off far too soon, leaving the next half of the film to dwell into monotony. The entire final third is essentially an elongated version of Female Trouble‘s courtroom scene – only not as funny and lacking so much of the bite.

Kathleen Turner does a great job herself; she is given a number of pretty funny scenes and lines to work with, and pulls them off rather well. Unfortunately, the work as a whole definitely felt like “Waters lite”. The substance is there, the themes are there, but much of the heart and liveliness that made his best films is unapparent. The jokes aren’t quite as humorous, and the overall grasp of wit that his films are so beloved for are pushed to the side to give way for a conventional, monotonous narrative structure. Even the PG-rated Hairspray felt more like a Waters film than this attempt, and that’s saying something! Overall, Serial Mom is enjoyable while it lasts, but overall pretty unsatisfying and, when it all boils down to it, an unfortunately disposable addition to the Waters filmography.

Man on Wire (2008) – dir. James Marsh

  • Watched on 21 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 6/10

More often than not, I prefer more “fly-on-the-wall” type documentaries (a lá Wiseman) than I do the “talking heads” type (a lá Morris). Of course this is a generalization, since there are certainly strengths and weaknesses to each kind, which are utilized differently film by film (and I also don’t believe in documentaries being seen through such a black-or-white kind of lens, but that’s a different story). My point being that Man on Wire, while intriguing enough, suffered from a lot of faults that come with such talking heads docs. Literal storytelling to an audience is not inherently full of fault, but here, there simply isn’t enough compelling material to stretch across an hour and a half of film. Thus, it has a prodding tendency to inject drama and humor into the film when, frankly, it doesn’t benefit much from it. It’s a compelling story, but one that perhaps cannot be so successfully conveyed in at least a full-length feature.

Nonetheless, I appreciate stories about individuals with a unique passion, so I find this film intriguing in that respect. The subject of the story is infectiously charismatic (even though he came off as a real ass at points), and the archive footage and photographs edited into the flick were interesting, often beautiful. I wasn’t sure if the reenactments of certain instances were all that necessary, but I digress. While I enjoyed Man on Wire for the temporary satisfaction of seeing its ambitious character seemingly walk on air, I don’t think I shall be returning to it any time soon.

Raiku Samuwan In Rabu (Like Someone in Love) (2013) – dir. Abbas Kiarostami

  • Watched on 21 January
  • Format: Blu-Ray
  • Rating: 9/10

Since it seems very well that Kiarostami can do no wrong, I was expecting pretty good things from his Japanese-language, Tokyo-set Like Someone in Love; what I didn’t expect was how it would be one of my very favorites from the filmmaker. Takanashi Rin is absolutely terrific as the protagonist, a young woman who struggles with the juggling of her multiple identities and the concealing of her not-so-flattering insecurities. I really love Kiarostami’s writing and direction, with its tendencies to move forward at a naturalistic pace, engaging in subtle unravellings of character and narrative as it progresses.

He is also an absolute master at long takes, incorporating them as an effective story device, but also as a way to throw in a few surprises. There are some curveball moments that are never quite explained, leaving the interpretation completely up to the viewer – most notably, the ending. It’s just another way of incorporating a sort of naturalistic mystery to the tale; thus, life is indeed full of mystery that may never be solved, secrets that may never be uncovered. At least not without repercussion. Like Someone in Love is a story of various characters, threaded together by circumstance and sudden conflict, and bonded by the thin veneer of voice recordings and telephone calls. It’s simply great.

După dealuri (Beyond the Hills) (2013) – dir. Cristian Mungiu

  • Watched on 21 January
  • Format: Blu-Ray
  • Rating: 8/10

After his utterly engrossing 4 Months, 3 Weeks, & 2 Days, I was excited to see what else Cristian Mungiu has up his sleeve with this follow-up. As it turns out, I was satisfied with what I saw. Though it doesn’t quite hit the level of extreme minimalism as 4 Months does, Beyond the Hills has its own share of advantages. The tension of Voichita’s reliance on her strict Orthodox belief is immediately apparent, and its clashing with Alina’s western upbringing is the main source of conflict in this slow-burn drama. What I loved the most was how ambiguous they made the relationship between Alina and Voichita; they grew up in the same orphanage, but it’s also heavily suggested that they were once lovers. This surely complicates the relationship, and they remain completely uncommitted to leaving each others side, even as the circumstances surrounding them become increasingly oppressive and absurd.

The writing is intriguing and craftily nuanced. The performances by our two leads are terrific. The cinematography is lovely, whether shooting from a distance or in enclosed, claustrophobic areas. My main issue comes with its pacing, which makes me wonder if the density of its substance was really needed so much. I really do think that a bit of editing would have made this a cleaner film, as it does tend to become plodding and repetitive, never quite building very much until the final third requires it to. Nonetheless, its oppressive, dreary atmosphere and compelling material certainly makes this a worthwhile watch, although not a very cheerful one.

Silent Movie (1976) – dir. Mel Brooks

  • Watched on 22 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 7/10

I consider Mel Brooks to be one of my very favorite filmmakers; nonetheless, his films are very much hit-or-miss for me. Some of his homages like Blazing Saddles andYoung Frankenstein are an absolute delight, while others like History of the World: Part I and Spaceballs – not so much. To me, Silent Movie falls somewhere in between. It definitely has a sense of humor that takes a little getting used to, but unlike some of his more profound duds, this one is quite a bit more inviting in tone and presentation. It pays homage to the classic slapstick comics like Chaplin and Keaton, and while some its attempts at humor fall a bit flat, others are surprisingly quite funny. It’s the kind of film that takes a little getting used to, but once the viewer is in, it’s strangely fascinating.

Also, the entire film is conveyed like a silent film – no dialogue, instrumental soundtrack – which adds to the fun even further. There are a few instances where, in typical Brooks fashion, the fourth wall is broken ever-so-slightly, and the music and sound effects become their own character. (I’m being vague in my description for good reason!) Even the cameo appearances are quite delightful, from Anne Bancroft, to Paul Newman, to Marcel Marceau (who probably has the best single scene of the film). The film has its drawbacks, sure, but as a silly Brooks-esque satire of silent cinema and the film industry as a whole, it’s all good fun. And really, what more could you ask for?

Big Top Pee-wee (1988) – dir. Randal Kleiser

  • Watched on 22 January
  • Format: Netflix Instant
  • Rating: 3/10

Big Top Pee-wee proves that no Pee-wee Herman film could ever be successful unless taken under the hands of Tim Burton. I’m not extremely familiar with the show, but I could only guess how much this would offend those who enjoy his character, as this film practically throws away any sense of likability the character possesses for the sake of juvenile attempts at “humor”. Suddenly, Pee-wee is residing at a farm, where he lives with a bunch of animals including a talking pig (because cuteness…?). Also, he’s an expert at agriculture for… well, I have no clue what that even adds to the story. But a storm causes an entire circus to blow onto his farm (because driving the narrative along…?). And yes, since it’s a circus, you could imagine the offensive humor that revolves around the presentation of these so-called “freaks”; 55 years after Tod Browning’s film and with a far downgraded sensibility.

But not even this could hold a candle to the fact that a love story is forced front-and-center of this movie. The running joke is that Pee-wee doesn’t like girls, and that’s why he kept turning down the adorable E.G. Daily in the first film. But no, in this movie, he suddenly has a fiancée… who he leaves for someone hotter and more Italian. And oh god, that sex scene; that’s the last thing I want to think about when I think about Pee-wee Herman. Realistically, though, it’s an unbelievable, under-developed relationship pasted into an equally under-developed comedy. And more importantly, the film is simply not funny. It lacks the slightly dark-tinged mood that makes Pee-wee’s Big Adventure so ingeniously crafted. And when that’s taken away – as well as any sort of innocence and charm of the character as a whole – all we have left is wankery. Which is exactly what this film is. Avoid.

Hey Arnold! The Movie (2002) – dir. Tuck Tucker

  • Watched on 22 January
  • Format: Netflix Instant
  • Rating: 6/10

Growing up, Hey Arnold! was always my favorite of the Nicktoons, and it even continues to be to this day. While I can’t exactly pinpoint what I loved about it as a kid, I appreciate it now for dealing with more darker and significant themes than shows like DougRugrats, and Ren & Stimpy. Sure there’s nothing special about its animation, but as a show about a group of kids that live in the often oppressive inner-city, I really like the directions they took each episode. With that being said, Hey Arnold! The Movie is essentially an elongated version of an episode from the show. Unfortunately, it’s one of the throwaway episodes. Its conflict – regarding a conglomerate who wants to tear down the neighborhood – is emotionally-charged from the start, but progressively descends to the levels of an ordinary spy/action flick, ending in an animated rehash of Speed.

My biggest issue, however: THERE’S NOT ENOUGH HELGA! I love her narrative subtext, and seeing her develop as a character would have been quite a pleasant treat. And no, professing her feelings to Arnold, only to take it all back at the end, doesn’t count as development. (Spoiler alert?) I recommend just sticking to the show; it has all the characters, and ten times the personality.

20 Feet From Stardom (2013) – dir. Morgan Neville

  • Watched on 22 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 8/10

Shortly after I finished watching 20 Feet from Stardom, I took a listen to the Rolling Stones’ “Gimme Shelter”. Sure, it’s a song that I’ve listened to many times before, but this documentary gave me incentive to listen to it in ways that I never have before. This documentary places emphasis on the true importance of the anonymous background singers of some of the most popular recording artists and singles we all know and love. And this importance is surely apparent. As one of the documentary’s subject’s notes, the hooks and choruses are usually given to the backing vocalists;“war, children; it’s just a shot away” is what everyone always sings along to, after all. Yet despite this popularity, these singers rarely been given a surefire chance to be in the limelight themselves – until now.

Apart from its eccentric, intriguing subjects, the film itself is presented like just another ordinary documentary. Some interviews here, some archival footage there. Thankfully, it’s a documentary that’s impossible to not have at least a little fun with, especially for a music lover (as I am). The singers featured here – Darlene Love, Merry Clayton, et al. – have such wonderful personalities and really fascinating backstage tales of performing with such musical legends like Stevie Wonder, the Stones, and Michael Jackson. It is this sense of warmth, love, and appreciation for their what they do – as under-praised as it may be – that keeps this film moving along at such a perfect pace, keeping itself compelling the whole way through.

It’s no lie that 2013 was an exceptionally terrific year for documentaries, yet I really I love this particular one more than others from the year, probably for many of the same reasons that Rewind This! is my #2 favorite doc of the year. Although it doesn’t carry the same level of artistic craft found in The Act of KillingStories We Tell, and Leviathan, it’s far more fun than all three of those combined. Come for the curiosity over its Oscar nomination; stay for its infectious sass, great music, and listening to such music in a perspective that has never been spotlighted previously.

Vampire’s Kiss (1988) – dir. Robert Bierman

  • Watched on 23 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 8/10

To quote a fellow movie-lover: “What the hell is Cage on??? And where can I get some?”

If Nicolas Cage is not the greatest actor of this generation, at the very least he is the most interesting. Vampire’s Kiss is a great example of this point. Sure, he starred in this film during the beginning stages of his career, but really, what other actor would perform in such a ludicrous role without fear that it would damage their reputation? Hell, he’s not even acting here, in the true sense of the word. It’s a performance that is akin to a circus clown riding a unicycle, only to slip on a banana peel and fall face-first in a swimming pool full of whipped cream pies… only to get up, brush himself off, and do the whole thing all over again.

His magnetism and pure insanity is truly something otherworldly and, positively, the best thing about this film. He makes it hilarious, which is a great thing since the rest of the film, frankly, isn’t all that great. It’s got its own special sense of charm to it, though. I think the second funniest thing about it is how desperately its techniques try to instill some sort of dignity to its product – e.g. shots of the cityscapes and sunsets, references to silent foreign cinema – all while not taking itself seriously at all. It’s a beautiful thing to witness and makes it all the more interesting. But really, everyone should just watch it for Cage alone. Trust me.

Now if you excuse me, I need to think of some reason I could incorporate screaming the alphabet into my day-to-day life.

Greed (1924) – dir. Erich Von Stroheim

  • Watched on 23 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 10/10

Much like my recent viewing of The Thief and the Cobbler, I had a rather frustrating time with watching Erich Von Stroheim’s intended masterpiece Greed; once again, the issue of studio interference hindered the final product from reaching its full potential. I watched the four-hour cut, which tries to piece together Von Stroheim’s intended vision by splicing in stills to replace the missing pieces. This is hardly a recompense, as the end result is a bit of an awkward presentation of what could have been. The first half is especially painful to watch, as it constantly reminded me just how little of the original eight-hour film truly exists.

But I’ll keep my quibbles at a minimum, because my goodness, what remains of this film is absolutely amazing. It successfully illuminates, through its course, how the simple, power of greed can turn comedy into tragedy, exuberance into death. At times I felt like I was watching a Griffith film, as the skill and craft behind its storytelling technique felt quite akin to Intolerance. Moreover, Zasu Pitts terrific performance, to me, runs parallel to that of Lillian Gish. At the start of the film and shortly after her run into money, she is glamorous and lovely; soon thereafter, she’s descends to such a pitiful state that mirrors Gish’s Broken Blossoms persona. That’s not to say that our other protagonist – played by Gibson Gowland – wasn’t nearly as heartbreaking to watch as well. From a simple, low-maintenance dentist, to a belligerent drunk, this downfall is not a pleasant watch. And in the back of our mind is Von Stroheim’s vision and intention for it all – ’tis greed and greed alone that caused this all to happen to such wonderful human beings.

While I mourn greatly for the unrepairable loss of more than half of Greed‘s footage, I am also willing to admit that the remaining gives us what could possible be one of the greatest films of all time. Despite its four-hour length – made all the more a struggle to watch with its implication of photographs – the way its fairly straight-forward narrative presented itself made it feel as if this time completely melted away, for me at least. It’s not hard to predict which directions its chronicles will go, but the amazing (and scary) part about it is we could truly see stories like these happening in real life to real people. It truly shows just how frighteningly relevant Von Stroheim’s film lies, even to the present day, and why I feel this film deserves all the praise in the world, despite its butchering.The final scene certainly stands to me as one of the greatest of the silent era. It allows reality to finally sink in, the absurdity of the events to come to true light, the triviality of greed and money to present itself fully – but only when it’s far too late to turn back time.

October (1924) – dir. Sergei Eisenstein

  • Watched on 24 January
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: 7/10

There has never been an Eisenstein film that I watched and haven’t thought, “wow, this is some really interesting editing!”. October is certainly no exception, but it offers more than that as well. It’s a reenactment of the turn-of-the-century October Revolution, when the Russian Bolsheviks revolted against their provisional government in favor of a more socialist regime. I’ve read that the retelling of this pivotal event in Soviet history is some of the most realistic, true-to-life footage of the event available to anyone, making this a truly important film for this reason. This is certainly apparent, as the level of emotion present here is at an intense high, as if every one of the players played a personal role in the actual events themselves. There are certainly a number of scenes that stick out far more than others, as it seems to be the case with much of Eisenstein’s work.

Once again, there are some rather interesting editing techniques here, mainly used in associating a compare-and-contrast between two symbols or images. And yes, lots of quick editing, often with shots only lasting one or two frames. And a single action being show again and again at different angles (like a particular chilling scene involving a dead woman and a horse). Overall, I think – as with Battleship Potemkin – the technical aspect, as well as its propagandistic elements, are what makes this film. It is noticeably lacking of the humanistic approach that I loved so much inStrike!; therefore, I didn’t find it interesting on a dramatic front. Nonetheless, it’s certainly an important work for many reasons, and would probably be of interest to anyone interested in or connected with the history of the Soviets.

I Know That Voice (2013) – dir. Lawrence Shapiro

  • Watched on 24 January
  • Format: iTunes rental
  • Rating: 7/10

I’ve been excited for this documentary since I watched the first trailer for it last spring. After following the film’s Facebook page diligently, I was pleased to see it was finally available on iTunes and Amazon. Finally, I can peer into the wide, wide world of voice acting, which I’ve always found particularly fascinating. It’s essentially a documentary featuring a bunch of voice actors who get to demonstrate their talents and talk about their careers. We get all the big names in contemporary voice acting here – Joe DiMaggio, Billy West, Tara Strong, Nancy Cartwright, Jim Cummings, et al. – as well as a few old school surprises, June Foray in particular.

It’s certainly not a perfect documentary, as it goes so in-depth with its material – covering every technical, business, and social aspect of voice acting imaginable – that it does tend to drag on for a bit at times. Nonetheless, this is perhaps its biggest flaw, which is fine since the rest of the film is perfectly pleasant. To my surprise, this was more than just a film where everyone sits around and talks in funny voices all day. The overarching goal is to propose voice acting as an art form, or at least just as much as conventional film, theater, and TV acting is. I’d say it succeeds in this, as it invites for a more open discussion regarding voice acting. It’s a talent that is not quite as recognized or praised as others in the media field, yet it undoubtably remains very, very important. I think the best thing this film does is offer the first stepping stone toward this direction, and I sincerely hope it gets more recognition from this point forward.

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Rush (2013) – dir. Ron Howard

  • Watched on 25 January
  • Format: Amazon rental
  • Rating: 7/10

Although Rush is certainly not the type of film I would normally willingly watch, I had no doubt that I would enjoy it at least a little bit. Although I’m not the least bit interested in most sports/competition themed films (and certainly not Formula 1), it’s hard to pass up a film as stylish-looking as this one. I didn’t particularly care for the story at all, as I could predict the directions it would take from the first 15 minutes (although this isn’t exactly a flaw, since it was based on a true story). But what made the film really interesting was Daniel Brühl’s performance, so full of sass and spite. I’m not sure how Chris Hemsworth got top billing for this, since Brühl’s character is far more interesting. And that’s where my biggest problem with the film lied. It took a more unconventional approach by not strictly following our protagonist’s arc the entire way through – we’re kind of split between the two – but Hemsworth is just so unappealing and so drab, I think it actually may have been a better film if, in the end, it wasn’t so apt to make it his story. Outside of this, I also really liked the way the races were shot, making viewers really feel the intensity as frenetic as these motor vehicles. That – and Brühl’s performance – is certainly what I’ll be taking the most out of this rather commonplace type of film.

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